My Own Story: Inspiration for the major motion picture Suffragette
By Emmeline Pankhurst
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The author grew up all too aware of the prevailing attitude of her day: that men were considered superior to women. When she was just fourteen she attended her first suffrage meeting, and returned home a confirmed suffragist. This title tells her story.
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Additional Details

My Own Story: Inspiration for the major motion picture Suffragette
9781473521933
Vintage Digital
8 January 2015
EPUB
  • Web browser / App
  • Adobe Digital Editions
352
1.17 MB
General Audience (0-99)
EN
English
Autobiography: Historical, Political & Military
College/higher education;Professional and scholarly;General/trade

Reviews

The finished product rests somewhere between a gripping novel and a painstaking historical record. No view of the suffragette story is complete without this comprehensive puzzle piece.

Author Biography

Emmeline Pankhurst was born in 1858 in Manchester, into a politically active family. She became interested in politics at a young age and a supporter of women's suffrage by the age of fourteen. As a teenager she attended school in Paris and on her return to Manchester she met and married Richard Pankhurst, a barrister twenty-four years her senior. Over the next ten years they had five children. Emmeline's interest in politics and involvement in the suffrage movement continued to develop and she was as a member of the Women's Franchise League and later the Independent Labour Party. In 1903, frustrated by the lack of progress on securing votes for women, Pankhurst and several colleagues founded the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU), a militant organisation devoted to securing votes for women by direct action. For the following twenty years, members of the WSPU, led by Pankhurst, endured prison and discrimination in their struggle to win the right to vote. Their activities were called to a halt by the start of the First World War but in 1918, the government gave voting rights to women over thirty. Emmeline died on 14 June 1928, shortly after women were granted equal voting rights with men.